I was thinking print because I understand that market much better, as I come from that world. Also, there is an immense amount of competition online, specifically regarding PPC. Finally, print offers something which PPC ads do not IMO, which is, when people see something in a newspaper or magazine, they give it more weight. They tend to put more trust into it. Even though they shouldn’t, they assume because something is in print, it must be good and worthy. However…
Today, if you're at all serious about succeeding in any endeavor, whether online or offline, you have to deliver enormous amounts of value. Yes, you have to do the most amount of work for the least initial return. This is especially true online. Why? Because it takes time to build authority and create an audience, two primary ingredients necessary to succeed in the wonderful world of commerce on the web.

It’s something akin to picking stocks. You want to buy undervalued domains, and sell them later on at a higher price. For example, you can pick a domain that is out of favor, but could be related to some future event. So if you decide that the stock market is likely to crash in the future, you can buy a domain that includes the words stock market crash during a rising market, and then sell it in a falling market.


The basic strategy is this: Post interesting content consistently with relevant hashtags. Use a service like Hashtagify for hashtag ideas. Follow users in your niche and engage with their posts. I also know a couple of people who grew their Instagram accounts quickly solely depending on shoutouts from influencers. You can use a service like ShoutCart for that or contact influencers directly (most of them list their email addresses in their bios).

My situation is I’m a Professor and Program Director for a Community College teaching massage therapy, a very in-demand field yet my college does little marketing. It’s my job to recruit students. I have a Facebook page and Twitter, and about 100+ followers on each. Can you see this type of system with funnels etc. working to help recruit potential students? If so, how? I feel like building content and creating opt ins should help, as we too are offering a “product”. Thanks for your time!


What print does not have going for it is, the ability to drill down and achieve incredible depths of consumer insight, and then reach those people based upon interests, age, hobbies, occupations, income levels and so forth. This is quite valuable. But it is also quite complex, and since it is not my main area of expertise, I would prefer to test the waters – at least initially – via print.
Learn then selling guidelines. Each marketplace has guidelines that define what you can and cannot sell. State and federal laws also impact what items are prohibited. In general, you cannot sell alcohol, weapons, service contracts, animals or event tickets. Also, while not always prohibited, you may find restrictions on how you can sell items in some categories, such as art, gift cards and coupons.[27] eBay, Craigslist and Amazon publish these guidelines on their websites.
Find your niche partners, collaborators, and champions: As you’re creating your course, look for notable people who are also creating content in the space. Look att how their businesses operate and incorporate that into your own plan. You can also reach out to any influencers and make them affiliates for your own course. This way, they’ll be incentivized to share your content with their own audiences (which can be a major way to generate your first sales—it helps if you're using one of the best CRMs for small business—and start building your own community!) 

If you are a budding photographer and would like to be paid for your craft then you should consider setting up your own photography website. This is a great way to not only promote your services as a photographer but also to sell your images. You can charge visitors a fee to download your images. Or, if you’d rather, turn your site into a paid membership site, with free downloads of all images for paying subscribers.

Better yet, you can even upload your own book to one of the world’s largest book sellers: Amazon. With Amazon self-publishing, you set the price, retain the rights to your book, and get access to Amazon’s massive audience. For every sale, you keep 70% with Amazon taking the remainder as a fee. If you want to get started, check out Leslie Samuel's great guide to selling eBooks online or follow Tara Gentile on CreativeLive as she shows you how to use your existing body of work to write an eBook within the next week. Who knows, you might just write one of the best business books of this year!
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